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The Jersey Curriculum - Maths & English (Early years, Reception, Years 1, 2 & 3)

By learningclubs, Nov 13 2017 10:00AM

Jersey is a unique place. Our Island is also closely linked by culture, family, location and history to neighbours, near and far. The Jersey Curriculum is designed to ensure children and young people grow and learn as well educated citizens of our Island and the world. It is based on the new National Curriculum in England, adapted to reflect both our Island’s unique heritage and environment and the needs of the local economy.

The Jersey Curriculum provides an outline of core knowledge around which teachers in our schools develop exciting and stimulating lessons to promote the development of pupils’ knowledge, understanding and skills as part of the wider school curriculum.


English, mathematics and science remain very important and are considered the core subjects in both primary and secondary education. The Jersey Curriculum sets out in some detail what must be taught in each of these subjects and they will take up a substantial part of your child’s learning week.


Mathematics in Year 1

As children begin Year 1, schools will naturally work to build on the learning that takes place in the Reception year.


Number and Place Value

Place value is central to mathematics. Recognising that the digit ‘5’ in the number 54 has a different value from the number 5 or the ‘5’ in 504 is an important step in mathematical understanding.


English in Year 1

During the early years of compulsory schooling, much of the focus is to develop confident readers, mainly using the phonics approach. Many schools will follow a programme of phonics teaching, so it is well worth finding out from your child’s school if they have any parent support materials.


Phonics is the relationship between printed letters and the sounds they make. Children will first learn the most common letter sounds, and then look at more difficult patterns such as recognising that ‘ow’ sounds different in ‘cow’ than in ‘low’, or that both ‘ai’ and ‘ay’ make the same sound in different words


Mathematics in Year 2

During Key Stage 1, there is a big focus on developing basic number skills. That means securing a good understanding of place value, and recognising number bonds to 20. Practising these skills frequently will help children’s mathematical thinking throughout school.


Number bonds are essential to the understanding of maths. Children in Year 2 learn their number bonds to 20, that is being able to quickly recall the total of any two numbers up to 20, e.g. 5 + 9 = 14, rather than having to count on to find the answer.


English in Year 1

During the early years of compulsory schooling, much of the focus is to develop confident readers, mainly using the phonics approach. Many schools will follow a programme of phonics teaching, so it is well worth finding out from your child’s school if they have any parent support materials.


Phonics is the relationship between printed letters and the sounds they make. Children will first learn the most common letter sounds, and then look at more difficult patterns such as recognising that ‘ow’ sounds different in ‘cow’ than in ‘low’, or that both ‘ai’ and ‘ay’ make the same sound in different words


Mathematics in Year 3

During the years of lower Key Stage 2 (Year 3 and Year 4), the focus of mathematics is on the mastery of the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) so that children can carry out calculations mentally, and using written methods. In Year 3 your child is likely to be introduced to the standard written column methods of addition and subtraction. Number and Place Value


English in Year 2

As children move through Key Stage 1, the new curriculum intends that almost all children will secure the basic skills of decoding so that they can become fluent readers. As their reading confidence grows they can begin to write their own ideas down.


Decoding is the ability to read words aloud by identifying the letter patterns and matching them to sounds. Once children are able to ‘decode’ the writing, they can then start to make sense of the words and sentences in context. Watch out for hard-to-decode words such as ‘one’ and ‘the’. These just have to be learned by heart.


English in Year 3 and Year 4

In lower Key Stage 2, your child will build on their work from Key Stage 1 to become more independent in both their reading and their writing. Most children will be confident at decoding most words – or will have extra support to help them to do so – and so now they will be able to use their reading to support their learning about other subjects. They will begin to meet a wider range of writing contexts, including both fiction and non-fiction styles and genres.


Alongside these are other familiar subjects, referred to as Foundation subjects in this guide: Art, Computing, Design and Technology, French, Geography, History, Music, PSHE (including Citizenship), Physical Education as well as Religious Education. Schools have more flexibility in what they cover in these subjects.


Early years Development Matters, a curriculum for under 5s covers the Early Years Foundation Stage (Nursery and Reception) in Jersey schools but also applies to private nurseries for younger children. It recognises how quickly children develop in the early years from birth and aims to give our youngest children the best possible start in life. Jersey recognises right a child has to to care and education that enables them to develop their personalities, talents and abilities whatever their ethnicity, culture or religion, home language, family background, learning difficulties, disabilities or gender. Development Matters sets out how each child should be given challenging and engaging opportunities in key areas.


These are Physical Development, Personal and Emotional Development and Communication and Language. It also covers Literacy, Mathematics, Understanding the World and Expressive Arts and Design. The aim is to foster effective early learning through playing and exploring, active learning, creativity and thinking critically.


Your child’s progress at school was previously measured using Levels between 1 and 6. These are now out of date because the curriculum has changed so Jersey schools are developing a new system of assessment. Your school will be able to give you more detail about how they measure your child’s progress.


If your child is achieving well, the school will encourage them to study subjects in more depth and carry out investigative work to allow greater mastery and understanding of concepts and ideas.


High achievers If your child is achieving well, the school will encourage them to study subjects in more depth and carry out investigative work to allow greater mastery and understanding of concepts and ideas.


As a rule, they will not move to the following year group’s curriculum ahead of time.


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